UB40 & Kid British

Is ska really dead? Likelihood people would say yes, but people and bands like this seem to keep it alive. UB40 and Kid British came through town and played at Brighton Dome last night. It didn’t look dead to me.

Arriving just in time for Kid British supporting UB40, due to the idiotic bouncer who made me go to three different entrances, I rocked up to the photo-pit, quickly arranged which lens to use (18-55mm 2.8) and took a few shots of the crowed before the British Kids walked on to an applause. All the lighting, upbeat members of the group and neon-lit  stage served as great reinforcements to kick start the adrenaline within  the venue.

Their set had a couple of songs I hadn’t heard before. I was hoping for some such as “Elizabeth” and perhaps a cover of  ‘Hot n Cold’ they have done, but that might be pushing it.  ‘It was this or football’ (Which I have and listen to in my car nearly every other day) is there album out now. ‘Lost in London’ was a pleasant surprise – this coming from a guy who’s seen the band a massive ZERO time before!

Openers Kid British did a great job in warming up the crowd. Their musical style is definitely heavier than UB40’s.  Their energy and passion was out of this world and proved worthy of a headlining show of their own in the near future.

UB40

Next up…UB40. As the lights went down and on walked Eddy, prompting the crowd to scream with excitement. It is safe to say that all of the tracks had that wonderful chilled out flavour with amazing background instrumentals (there was about 5 guys with saxophones and other jazz like instruments) which I’m guessing has made UB40 an internationally successful band. Kingston Town, Red Red Wine, One in Ten and Higher Ground.

These fantastic tunes lured the crowd off their seats. I’ve got to admit, the atmosphere was electric.

A fantastic venue, complimented by an amazing support act in Kid British, surpassed only by the performance of UB40, who are every bit as vibrant and fresh as 30 years ago!

Words and photography by Andy Shamoon (www.andyshamoon.co.uk)