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Music |

Review: Big Wave- The Roots of Love

Friday 08 June 2012
Words Spindle

Before any introduction or analysis of the pros and cons of Torquay’s Big Wave can begin, there is an important note to be made: The Roots of Love EP is not ‘chillwave’ by genre, if such a sub-genre fabrication actually exists. The music produced by this 5 piece is one of the clearest possible examples of lo-fi you can find and if anyone event attempts to tell you otherwise, you should cause them extreme bodily harm as a service to accurately categorized music lovers everywhere. That public service statement finished aside, there is a great deal of positives with this new release.

It is pretty much a given with any release by a lo-fi band that originality is going to be low on the ground, so it would serve well to omit that discussion and look at the positives of The Roots of Love.

From the off, there is every point of reference you wish for here, all in the right measure. Starting with a laid back Pavement and adding everything from Archers of Loaf to Afgan Whigs along the way to pop melodies that Kim Deal of Pixie’s fame would be proud of, there is a lot to enjoy.

Second track Blissed Out has got to be one of the most naturally addictive two and a half minutes of fuzzy pop since Bethany Cosentino cropped up way back in 2010. They also manage to show a little psychedelic edge with The Leavers using some lovely vocal effects that come from old battered boxes and not an Apple Mac.

To be honest, you could easily sing the praises of this perfect lo-fi 5 track until ‘new rave’ is back in fashion, but you won’t. Because, if scuzzy lo-fi pop is your thing, you’ll still be listening to Pavement, The Afgan Whigs and Sebadoh, not the new millennium’s equivalent. Inspiration in music is a beautiful thing; repetition is not and, as a result, The Roots of Love (Come Tumbling Down) falls short.

Words: Ben Clark