We Are The Bomb!

Canada on the eve of prohibition: a law banning all alcohol comes into effect at midnight tonight, causing a disparate group of drinking enthusiasts to come together in their favourite bar for one last hurrah. With the spirit of revolution in the air, they band together and declare a secession from the nation of Canada, with hilarious and surprisingly moving results.

So begins We Are The Bomb by Theatre Brouhaha, which kicked off the Toronto Fringe Festival with a production that felt like it set the benchmark sky-high for the rest of the Festival. It’s a breakneck-speed, madcap hour as patrons go from merely wanting to drink the bar dry to deciding to break off into a independent nation. Things take a turn in the later half with some unexpected tension and ultimately very moving moments. Many of the characters struck a chord with the audience which was made up mostly of young, professional urban Torontonians: from the pretty student who nervously enters the bar to meet a guy from an internet dating site (we’ve all been there) to the brave 16-year-old who declares she came to the bar to “fight for her future right to drink” and “make stupid decisions as a result.” The girl’s certainly got spirit! The actors here truly inhabit their characters, with no-one playing it just for laughs and instead letting the honesty of what could be an absurd situation play itself out.

As the chaos unfolds and the temperature of this hot and sticky Toronto summer rises to boiling point, so too do the temperaments of the would-be revolutionaries. We won’t spoil the show any further but we will say this: be prepared to watch this wild whiskey fueled revolution unfold around you. Also, having a stiff drink to hand will probably help – while you still can.

With all the action taking place in The Paddock bar, you’re right there in the thick of it, drinking and revolutionizing alongside these spirited folks. The Paddock is one of Toronto’s oldest bars (it dates from the 1940s; not that impressive to European reviewers for whom ‘oldest bar’ usually means a 13th century inn that was built by a saint or something), so it’s an appropriate non-traditional setting that emphasized one of the main themes of the play: just how much can you shape human behaviour by curbing personal liberty? It seems writer Kat Sandler hit the jackpot with the play’s booze-soaked civil liberty theme, just as Toronto’s Police plan on clamping down on public drinking in Trinity Bellwoods park. (Outraged like us? Sign the petition!)

For a relevant take on personal liberties as well as a satire on the nature of revolution and those that instigate it, get yourself down to The Paddock to check out these madcap folks and join them in stickin’ it to the man.

Tickets available at the door and in advance.

Show times:

July 05 07:30 PM
July 06 07:30 PM
July 07 02:00 PM
July 09 07:30 PM
July 10 07:30 PM
July 11 07:30 PM
July 12 07:30 PM
July 13 07:30 PM
July 14 02:00 PM

Words: Tia Clarke and Thomas Dearnley-Davison