Review: Sadie Frost in ‘Dotty’

Dotty is an experimental short film starring Sadie Frost and her son Rudy Law. They form a couple of unlikely friends after a brief meeting somewhere in the Nevada desert, in 1969. It’s a fun little film about a bored young boy (Law) who is left to wander around the desolate landscape with nothing to do but play with a stick, until a battered old mobile home plonks itself right besides him.

In the van is Dotty (Frost), a gum-chewing grey-haired woman with pop socks and sandals adorning her feet, who quickly befriends the boy, first off by offering him some lemonade in her van – which houses a vast shoe collection, one pair of which links to the twist later in the film. They then proceed to dance to the radio, and then have fun in the desert until the sun sets. When they return, the truth about Dotty is uncovered, and it links this short film nicely to an all time classic that is known the world over.

Admittedly, it is heavy on the clichés, and it would have worked better if some of the slightly trite filmic references had been played down – such as the animal skull in the opening sequence, and the constant tumble weed sound effect that was inconsistent and irritating – but it has a charm, the story itself plays out well, the characters are engaging, and it ends leaving enough to the imagination, without leaving the viewer wondering what in the Sierra Nevada had just happened.

You can also check out our interview with director Ben Charles Edwards.

Words: Dante Fewster Holdsworth
Dotty Trailer: Ben Charles Edwards on Vimeo.