BACARDÍ : Some men are kicked out of bars – others are kicked out of countries

From a simple rum and coke (a Cuba Libre to cocktail connoisseurs) to Mojitos, Mai Tais and daiquiris, I love a BACARDÍ based cocktail. Yet, apart from being a particularly tasty spirit and the bottle donning a bat logo, I knew very little about the brand.

I was intrigued to find out that BACARDÍ were launching a new campaign that did not solely focus on the spirit, but delved into the brand’s turbulent heritage. Not many families can withstand earthquakes, fires, wars and revolutions, as well as U.S. prohibition and being exiled from Cuba. So it is no surprise that the ad you may have seen on the tube and TV uses the strapline BACARDÍ: untameable since 1862.

Spindle were invited to the campaign launch at One Mayfair and re-lived the journey that US citizens took in search of a drink (or several) during Prohibition. No booze in the U.S.? Solution: Pop across to Cuba and be greeted by a bottle of rum and a party.  At One Mayfair, after checking in and passing through ‘airport’ security (literally) I was transported to Cuba where the party was in full swing. A live band donned Fedoras (apparently ‘on trend’ at the moment) and I was soon engulfed by a sea of people who were taking full advantage of the incredible array of Bacardi-based cocktails.

After trying several and making friends with the barmen (the picture says it all), i settled for a favourite: The Anejo Highball (BACARDÍ GOLD, Cherry Heering, fresh lime, Angostura bitters, ginger beer, garnished with orange slice).

As the launch slowly drew to a close (much to my disappointment), I departed from Cuba and landed smack bang back on the tarmac of New Bond Street. When delving more into Bacardi’s history (after a couple of aspirins and pints of water), it became clear that Cuba is at the heart of the BACARDÍ story. The BACARDÍ  families  humble beginnings started in Santiago de Cuba, their family homes were confiscated by the revolutionary Cuban administration, the Bacardí family was finally exiled from Cuba as well as being major contributors to the Cuban fight for independence.