LUCY JAY SCARFS

Collaborating with Photographer Will Grundy, Lucy Jay has documented a series of her followers exploring the different ways they like to wear their Lucy Jay scarf.  Each style has demonstrated a range of ideas from the traditional to the more quirky. We see how a Lucy Jay scarf plays a part in their everyday style and gives others inspiration on how to wear their own.  Lucy Jay is renowned for her bright and individual prints and with these portraits we can really see how she has reinvented scarf design and the luxury product. By simply adding their Lucy Jay scarf to their outfit they instantly individualise to their look.

RuthRuth, 27, London

PHD Student Kings College

The Rosie Scarf, is from Lucy’s third collection, called ‘The Good Collection’ It was inspired by the layouts and styles of football scarves which has been represented with the mono colours and placement of the geo shapes.  Their long style is perfect for head scarves or, as Ruth has demonstrated, as bra tops in the summer.

CherryCherry, 24, London

Marketing Manager

From the Texas collection, the Angela Scarf incorporates a blend of bold shapes and intricate detailing, taking everything the label is known and loved for, thus creating a harmonious celebration of this innovative collection and Lucy Jay’s unique portrayal of the Americana theme.

DanDan, 28, London

Carpenter

The Angela Pocket Square. The range of pocket squares show that however you choose to wear yours, it is obvious that Lucy has no longer been restrained by the limits of her imagination whilst still remaining honest to her brands distinctive style with the bold and bright colours of this pocket square.

ZealahZeelah, 21, London

Drummer of Pale Seas

From the Kreitzman Collection, the Jen Scarf. Lucy took her inspiration from colourful character Sue Kreitzman, an artist from New York living in East London. The bright colours and themes are Lucy’s take on Sue and her work, combined together to create the most bold and intricate collection yet, including scarves in a variation of shapes and sizes.

HeatherHeather, 26, London

Stylist and Editor-In-Chief of Spindle Magazine

The Elliot Scarf. The vision for this collection derives from the idea of morphing together two ideas that are not necessarily associated with each other and representing them through shapes and sophistication. ?While referencing classic styles, Lucy’s iconic graphical prints take these ideas further.