Behind the music video: The Carnabys – Peaches and Bleach

The Carnabys are: Ben Gittins, Mike Delizo, Jack Mercer, Frankie Connolly and James Morgan. A 5-piece British band from South West London who catapulted onto the industry stage when they beat over 12,000 global artists to win ‘Hard Rock Rising 2013’.  The process saw them face two live judging panels of industry experts, including Steve Van Zandt from Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band and Phil Manzanera from Roxy Music, to win their final accolade to support Bruce Springsteen at Hard Rock Calling 2013.  Since then the boys have been on a collision course to world success as they sell out gigs all over London including venues such as KOKO, Garage The Borderline and The Jazz Café. They’ve also performed to hundreds of thousands of fans as they’ve shared the stage with the likes of Lenny Kravitz, Kings Of Leon, Fratellis, Palma Violets, Bruce Springsteen and Patti Smith. We catchup with Jack from The Carnabys to discover the story behind the music video.

Tell us a bit about the music video?

So the music video ties in with the meaning of Peaches and Bleach as a song. It’s about having worked on something, whether it be a song, an artwork or relationship, you can interpret it in your own way, but then someone adding to it, believing they’re helping but fucks it all up, essentially ‘bleaching the peach’… So the music video follows this concept but on a larger scale. We feel that a lot of what gets released by the mainstream industry has the same look, feel and sound, almost as if these artists have been produced in the same way, at the same place. The video takes place in a music video studio where supposedly everyone and anyone goes to get their videos done. The panel of buttons is the same for everyone, and contains the same buy viagra online 25mg effect such as ‘hot girl, sports car, gorilla, snow, rain etc’ .. The Carnabys are using the studio and too much is added to their production, and it all goes horribly wrong. A lot like what’s happening with most major music releases these days..

Who was the director?

The videographers – Jack Durman and John Ingle – and us wanted to tie in with the meaning of the song, and they did very well with producing this concept that does so and means a lot more. They were great with directing us over the two days.

How involved are you all in the ideas process of the videos and release artwork?

The videos we’ve released so far have all had a huge input from us.. Though we’re not videographers. So we tend to explain our ideas, and are then told what’s doable within our time frame and what isn’t.. For example ‘no, you can’t have indoor fireworks’.

As music is so digital these days, do you think the importance of music videos has heightened?

Not necessarily, I think people are realising that you don’t need to spend Tens of thousands on music videos these days. The song is the most important thing, and I guess people create videos they think people will watch again and again, therefore listening to the song again and again. People just try to make their videos as interesting as possible… I think?

What are each of your fave music videos?

I love the video for ‘Bohemian like you’ by the Dandy Warhols. It’s full of right characters.. And they clearly haven’t spent thousands on quality. The video’s interesting, fun and gets the song across well, and that’s what matters.