Music Matters: Interview with Blood Brother

Wowzas, it’s been a year since the night tube has been running in London, and already the city has seen a boost in jobs and the economy, and a whopping 6.5 million journeys. However despite that, we’re still witnessing more and more venue closures, with 43% of night clubs have closed across the UK in the past five years. Our pal Alan Miller has been doing an amazing job campaigning for the Night Time Industries, and most recently Selfridges have collaborated with a whole heap of music and fashion talent for Music Matters – a series of live gigs and capsule collections from brands around the world in response to the rate of music venue closures across the UK.

One of the fashion collaborations is our favourites Blood Brother, who have a collection of tees, hoodies and bags in 90s colours inspired by rave culture. We caught up with Blood Brother to find out more about their involvement with Music Matters, and some of their favourite clubbing memories.

How did the music matters capsule collection with Selfridges come about?
Selfridges has asked various brands to join them in a collaboration with the working title Music Matters. It’s in response to the amount of London music establishments that have closed down recently.

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Tell us about the importance of music to the Blood Brother band
Before we had any presence in fashion week we were putting on parties with our friends and found this an altogether more holistic approach to showing our ‘brand’. Music is integral to our ethos – at the start we just wanted to to make tees for our friends and have a good time.

 

Youth culture loves having something to fight and this is it! I hope that this turns out to be a punctuation on the way we party.

 

Tell us about your favourite clubbing memories?
Living in Dalston in from 2007 onwards it was pretty good to see the continued development and growth of that area as a place to enjoy a night out, originally it was the Dalston superstore but latterly we would enjoy the Alibi as the experience was altogether more intimate and inclusive while remaining welcoming and unpatronising in its approach to newcomers.

 

43% of nightclubs in the UK have been closed down in the last five years – what do you think can be done to save our nightlife?
Nightclubs may have been closing down which is sad but I don’t believe in the slightest that nocturnal activity has in any way declined, I think people are finding different ways to enjoy the night. It feels that people are looking for a more authentic experience, there are more festivals than ever both summer and winter and people will never stop innovating with night time ‘experiences’ becoming popular – something that seems extremely exciting.

 

What impact do you think the night life closures is going to have on youth culture?
Youth culture loves having something to fight and this is it! I hope that this turns out to be a punctuation on the way we party.

 

It’s amazing that Selfridges are hosting the live gigs and capsule collections, do you think this will inspire global brands and other retailers to support the initiative too?
Hopefully, there is nothing better than live music, it literally changes your perception of the artist, song or piece when someone is performing live – it should be embraced and brands and stores should always support in this way where possible.

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How have the night time industries benefited your brand?
We have loved putting on parties and special events that usually start in the night time and often bleed into the next day :-) – its these moments that people live for and remember above all so we feel immense satisfaction in our continued alignment to live music and young artists.

 

The collection is available online and in-store at Selfridges now, and you get tickets for the live events including Joy Crookes, Pixx and Croox  here.